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News Archive

Search the news archives of NIFES and HI, respectively, to find news published before 2017.

Result: (51) Showing 31 - 51

Went from too little to harmful levels of iodine

24.07.2017

The prevalence of goitre used to be high in the mountainous country of Nepal, and children were born with brain damage because of serious iodine deficiency. Now, Norwegian research shows, on the contrary, that many Nepalese people have a too high iodine intake. What happened?

Research Council of Norway provides funding for new robotic floats

26.06.2017

The Norwegian Minister of Trade and Industry Monica Mæland visited the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen to pass on the good news. During her visit, she met one of the cylindrical, yellow “marine scientists” that will drift on the ocean currents.

Inspiring gathering with Strategic Advisory Board

16.06.2017

– This has been a great and inspiring experience. It’s been fantastic to have access to some of the world’s best researchers for three full days, says Sissel Rogne, the IMR’s Managing Director, who hosted the first meeting of its Strategic Advisory Board.

EU research and innovation Director-General visits the IMR

14.06.2017

Robert-Jan Smits, the Director-General of research and innovation in the EU, visits the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen wednesday.

Recommends reducing cod quota by 20%

13.06.2017

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) recommends that the cod quota in the Barents Sea next year does not exceed 712,000 tonnes. This is a reduction of 20% compared to this year’s quota.

“We are experiencing a natural decline in Atlantic cod stocks, which we need to take into consideration,” says the Research Director at the Institute of Marine Research, Geir Huse.

Norway receives praise for its ocean science

13.10.2017

Norway received the IOC prize for its ocean science knowledge and capacity. Director General of NIFES Ole Arve Misund accepted the prize on behalf of Norway during the UN Ocean Conference in New York this week.

Norwegian bivalve molluscs in good condition

24.05.2017

The annual monitoring showed that one in four flat oysters had cadmium levels above the maximum level, but that Norwegian bivalve molluscs are otherwise in good condition.

Why do more farmed salmon lose their sight in summer?

22.05.2017

Farmed salmon often lose their sight in summer as cataracts make their eyes opaque. This happens when the temperature rises, but exactly why it happens has not been known. Scientists at NIFES have now found out more about the link between sea temperature and blindness in salmon.

Dr. Fridtjof Nansen has started working

18.05.2017
Cruise leader Reidar Toresen reports that the new research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen is well under way on its very first cruise off North-West Africa.
 
– We left Casablanca in the evening 8 May and we are now working in the ocean between Morocco and The Canary Iles until 7 June, says Toresen. – During 2017 the goal is to cover the whole west coast of Africa, from Casablanca to Cape Town, he adds. 

Plan to merge the Institute of Marine Research and NIFES

12.05.2017

In its revised national budget, the Norwegian government proposes merging the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and NIFES – The National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research.

Potentially dangerous parasite found in farmed fish from Vietnam

03.08.2017

NIFES scientists were surprised to find the parasite Chinese liver fluke in farmed Pangasius in Vietnam. At worst, the parasite can cause serious liver disease and cancer if the actual seafood is eaten raw, without prior freezing or properly heating.

Sufficient levels of marine fatty acids in fish deprived Nepal

04.05.2017

Bhaktapur is nearly 1,000 kilometres away from the nearest ocean. Nevertheless, the Nepalese have good levels of marine fatty acids in their blood. The reason for this is a mystery to scientists.

Very high levels of undesirable substances in halibut weighing over 100 kg, but low levels in smaller halibut

26.04.2017

Large halibut weighing over 100 kg contain very high levels of undesirable substances, according to a new survey. Halibut weighing less than 40 kg, however, which accounted for more than 80 per cent of the analysed fish, contained low levels of undesirable substances like mercury and organic contaminants. For 85 per cent of the halibut analysed, the levels of undesirable substances were below the EU maximum level in all parts of the fillet.

Low folate in feed leads to fewer and weaker fish embryos

31.03.2017

Deficiencies in B vitamins such as folate and vitamin B12 affect the offspring’s genes. Studies on fish show that even a slight B vitamin deficiency leads to much lower fecundity and weaker offspring.

Prime Minister to name new research vessel

22.03.2017
Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg will name the new Norwegian research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen Friday 24 March in Oslo harbour. The vessel represents the pinnacle of Norwegian marine technology, and will play a central role in the EAF-Nansen Programme which over the last 40 years has aided coastal nations in Africa and Asia in  developing marine research and sustainable fisheries management. 

More environmental pollutants in wild salmon than in farmed salmon

24.03.2017

The levels of environmental pollutants are higher in Norwegian wild salmon than in Norwegian farmed salmon. These are the results of a recent Norwegian study. This is the first major study to compare the species of wild salmon that lives in Norwegian waters (Salmo salar), with Norwegian farmed salmon.

No Anisakis in farmed rainbow trout

26.01.2017

No Anisakis was found in farmed rainbow trout intended for human consumption, shows a new report from NIFES.

Good status for imported seafood

13.10.2017

Seafood imported to Norway in 2015 was of overall good quality and rarely exceeded the applicable maximum limits for contaminants and infective agents.

State-of-the-art research vessel for Development Cooperation

10.01.2017

The new RV Dr. Fridtjof Nansen arrived in her home harbour Bergen for the first time today.  Now starts a two months period of testing of equipment and functions before she leaves Casablanca in the beginning of May for her very first scientific survey.  

Publication prize for “knock-out” article on genetics

05.01.2017

Anna Wargelius received the Institute of Marine Research’s 2016 publication prize for an article on how mutations can be used to change the DNA sequence in salmon. Essentially, the technique involves “knocking out” specific genes to create a sterile farmed salmon.

King and president joined mackerel-dugnad

01.01.2017

Since 2011, over 250,000 mackerels have been electronically tagged and released back into the sea. On Thursday King Harald of Norway and the Icelandic presidential couple sent out another three mackerels to collect data in the name of research.