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Background

In the second in the series of Fishery Dependent Information symposia we will consider the changing face of fisheries management and the related data and knowledge needs. The conference will explore the role of fishers in collecting data, the incorporation of fisher-collected data and knowledge in science, management and policy-making, and the broader role of stakeholders in this process.

This will be supported by a dedicated session on the outcome of the EU-funded EcoFishMan project which will review recent advances in the field of results-based management, and consider international experiences and lessons learnt in self-regulation fisheries management systems.

In general, we seek presentations and posters which focus on fishery dependent information requirements to support science, management and policy development, and on the collection and use of fishery dependent data, including conventional and novel data collection methods, analysis and interpretation. In particular, the conveners would like to stimulate discussions at regional and global scales concerning challenges in the collection, compilation and interpretation of catch, bycatch and ancillary data. We therefore encourage broad international participation.
We seek presentations falling under four broad areas, including:

  • Data Requirements - data required for evolving policy and management frameworks, such as the ecosystems approach to fisheries (EAF), results-based management, and risk management; requirements for self-evaluation of fisheries governance
  • Data Collection – observer programs; cooperative research with industry; innovative data collection strategies such as self sampling and reference fleets; Electronic Monitoring systems; ancillary data collection during fishing operations in support of the EAF
  • Data Integration – integration of multiple and/or increasing sources of data; open-source data repositories and metadata catalogues to support fishery dependent analyses
  • Data Analysis – evaluation of fishery dependent data, including impacts of fishing on target and bycatch species, on fish communities and habitats, and as indicators for stock condition and distribution; impacts of uncertainty and bias on stock assessments and inclusion of this uncertainty in policy development; selection of appropriate metrics to define fishing effort; evaluation of the effectiveness and impact of increased (or full) catch retention requirements - are essential to the achievement of affordable and sustainable fishing practices”