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Salmon lice
Photo: Sussie Dalvin
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The Salmon Louse Genome is made Accessible

The generated results from the sequencing of the salmon louse genome will be made publicly available. These data will play a major role in the development of salmon louse vaccine and chemical delousing treatment.

The salmon louse genome is sequenced and initial analyses have been performed.

The parties involved in the sequencing (Institute of Marine Research, University of Bergen, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Uni Research, Marine Harvest and The Fishery and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund) have decided make the generated results accessible to all research environments. This will provide an important resource that will improve future scientific progress. Access to the results will be given at certain conditions to a safeguard the scientific interests of the sequencing partners.

For information on access to the results contact project leader Rasmus Skern-Mauritzen. Find contact information on right side of the web page.

Facts about sea lice

Latin name: Lepeophtheirus salmonis
Distribution: occur naturally in Norwegian waters. Their numbers have risen significantly in parallel with the growth of the aquaculture industry.
Biology: sea lice are parasites with eight life stages, three of which are free-swimming, two of which are stationary and three of which are mobile. They attach themselves to salmon in the third life stage.
Size: adult female: 12 mm (approx. 29 mm including egg strings); adult male: 6 mm.
Diet: the skin and blood of salmonids. The lice only start feeding when they have attached themselves to a host fish (stationary and mobile stages).
Reproduction: all year round, but reproduce increasingly quickly as temperatures rise in spring.
Dispersal: free-swimming stages spread on currents in fjords and coastal waters.
Treatment: biological methods (wrasse) or chemicals (medication).

Sea lice


Rasmus Skern
400 69 007
Marie Hauge
975 68 384